The Ethiopian-born PCSO who claimed deep-seated and cunning racism. to have, loses a legal battle

The Ethiopian-born PCSO who claimed deep-seated and cunning racism. to have, loses a legal battle

Tegegn Bayissa, from Manchester, gave colleagues the preconception that they would make a career
He claims he could not go on patrol himself and said it was racism
But when he made a claim for racial discrimination, the real reason came to light – because the PCSO had made a catalog of basic mistakes

The Ethiopian-born Tegegn Bayissa had claimed that his career had been wrecked by deep-rooted and sly & # 39; racism.

The police support officer blamed colleagues’ prejudices for their refusal to let him patrol unattended.

He stressed that this was the only possible explanation, since his role is not rocket science & # 39; was a role that even a teenager could play.

The Ethiopian-born Tegegn Bayissa (photo) had claimed that his career had been destroyed by deep-rooted and cunning. racism

But when he had a claim for racial discrimination, the real reason came to light – because the PCSO had made a catalog of basic mistakes, one of which had been able to see him arresting.
After hearing how top officers had given Mr Bayissa every opportunity to take control, a labor court rejected his claim at 47 points.

The Greater Manchester police, however, has now given up an invoice of £ 20,000 after saying that he could not cover the costs.

The university trained Mr. Bayissa joined the force as a £ 25,000 per year PCSO in 2014 as part of an effort to attract more ethnic minority officers.
In an ingenious way he succeeded in confusing a routine function for marking safety signs during a family day, without applying lacquer to the ink, so that the details could easily be swept away by a thief.

He received a warning after he failed to report an attack after a traffic accident, acknowledging that he did not know what officers should do after a traffic accident.

On one occasion he found a cell phone, but instead of surrendering it to lost objects, he put it in his drawer – which could have led to his arrest.

A shopkeeper on his ride refused to believe that he was a real PCSO because he did not seem to know what he was doing.

Bayissa claimed that “officers were desperately looking for errors in his actions.” In 2016 he stopped to launch a race claim.

Mr. Bayissa argued that he was the victim of deep-rooted and cunning police racism, with the question: What part of the role of PCSO is so difficult for a man who is training on university level?

& # 39; A teenager with not much life experience can work as a PCSO. The role … was not rocket science. & # 39;

The tribunal panel disagreed and said that senior officers had shown enormous patience as he struggled.

Mr. Bayissa was “resistant to suggesting that he could learn something from the incidents he had encountered,” they said, and added: “It seems to us that [he] underestimated the difficulty of the role. & # 39;

Yesterday, during his stay in Manchester, Mr Bayissa, who is now unemployed, said that he did not accept the Tribunal’s conclusions, but had no more money to appeal – or to pay the police’s legal fees.

The Greater Manchester police (headquarters, photo) has now given an invoice of £ 20,000 after saying that he could not cover his costs

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